Rescue Report

The Equine Comeback Challenge: Trainer Interview

October 06, 2014

“It isn't about the blue ribbon,” says equine trainer Tammy Marsh.

Marsh is one of the competitors in The Equine Comeback Challenge on October 14, 2014, at the 2014 Pennsylvania National Horse Show.

“What I want the audience to get from the competition day is that there are 10 horses that were unwanted and have come a long way in a relatively short period of time.”

The Equine Comeback Challenge features rescue horse/trainer pairs who compete in a 90- Tammy Marsh
Credit: Tammy Marsh
day transformation process. The rescued horses get a chance to show their true ability as an equine partner.

The rescue horse Marsh has been working with is a 6-year-old Standardbred named Neil. Neil was seized in a cruelty case in September 2013. He was severely emaciated, but has been returned to health with proper nutrition.

 “I truly believe that each horse I work with teaches me something about horses, something about myself, and something about life in general," Marsh told The Trail Rider.

Marsh also revealed that Neil has taught her about balance, not only on his back, but also in her life.

“Learning to balance everything I want to do and need to do in a days’ time was an important lesson and reminder from Neil,” Marsh said. “He’s reminded me to slow down and just be. That’s the best way to stay balanced.”

What sort of rider would be best for Neil in his forever home?

“Neil has proven himself to be an awesome trail horse,” Marsh noted. “Absolute beginners have ridden him with confidence.”

However, Marsh admitted, Neil is taken.

“I’ve spent the last year looking for a replacement for my former equine partner,” she said. “Neil is it. He’s the perfect fit for my family and the programs here at Palomino Acres.”

So, there's a happy ending for Neil, who now has a forever home with Marsh.

Would March enter the contest again?

“I absolutely would do this challenge again,” she exclaimed. “It’s a wonderful way to showcase rescue horses and the potential they have, as well as providing a wonderful experience for the trainers.”

 

For more information about the Equine Comeback Challenge go to: www.ahomeforeveryhorse.com/equine-comeback-challenge

To follow Tammy Marsh’s progress with Neil, go to: http://ahomeforeveryhorse.com/article/tammy-marsh-neil-23886


Follow the Equine Comeback Challenge

September 08, 2014

Courtesy of Tammy Marsh
Credit: Courtesy of Tammy Marsh
Neil's first day trotting.
Training competitions abound in the horse world. There’s the Extreme Mustang Makeover, Road to the Horse, and the Mustang Million. Now there’s the Equine Comeback Challenge, introduced by A Home for Every Horse.

A Home for Every Horse was founded by our sister website, Equine.comThe World’s Largest Equine Marketplace. This site uses its vast network to help find forever homes unwanted horses.

The Equine Comeback Challenge will be held on October 14, 2014, at the 2014 Pennsylvania National Horse Show. AHFEH has paired 10 trainers with 10 horses for 90 days of training in preparation for the competition.

The trainer who’ll be associated with the magazine I work on, The Trail Rider, is Tammy Marsh of Palomino Acres Equine Services. In my interview with Tammy, I found a trainer who understands the importance of taking your time, even during a training competition.

As a trainer of rescue horses myself, I really appreciate this approach. Such horses need often need an abundance of time and patience to get them to a place where they can trust their new trainers and owners.

During the interview, Tammy described starting slowly with her project horse, Neil. Right off, she noticed something was wrong and immediately called in an equine chiropractor. She also had Neil’s teeth floated (filed down for bit comfort) before pushing him forward.

“There’s no benefit in rushing something to win a prize,” Tammy told me.

Good for you Tammy; it’ll be great to follow your progress with Neil.

When people are willing to put horses first, training competitions can be a powerful tool for bringing awareness to issues in the horse world, as well as highlighting the amazing bond that’s possible between horse and human.

For more information about the Equine Comeback Challenge go to: www.ahomeforeveryhorse.com/equine-comeback-challenge

To follow Tammy Marsh’s progress with Neil, go to:

http://ahomeforeveryhorse.com/article/tammy-marsh-neil-23886

 


Rescue Report: Jigging All the Way Home

August 04, 2014


One of my favorite things about Banjo, my rehabilitated rescue horse, is that he’s great on trail rides. He’s fine going out by himself without other horses. He’s confident, and he walks calmly on the way back to the barn.

Walking back to the trailer or barn may not seem like a big deal, unless you own a jigger. A jigger is what I call a horse that jigs, a bouncy gait between the walk and a trot.

Jiggers always prance their way home from a ride. They even have an uncanny sense of where the halfway point is on a loop ride, knowing when they pass that magical point where home is closer going forward than going back.

Years ago, I adopted a second rescue horse, Luna, who was a jigger.

It wasn’t really her fault. She was a Thoroughbred/Arabian Horse cross, bred specifically for endurance riding.

Luna always wanted to go fast. She was happiest flying across a field. Walking was a waste of time for her. And her mouth was hard, insensitive. This was probably due to improper riding with harsh bits.

To retrain Luna, I first taught her to yield to pressure in a rope halter. I also taught her the one-rein stop, which is means the horse bends to a stop in response to pressure on one rein. I then added a gentle bit and began teaching her about softening: responding to gentle cues.

At 15 years old, Luna wasn’t easy to retrain. At first, she was very anxious. But she began to come around and even started to enjoy the training.

However, Luna would always jig on the way home from trail rides.

I wasn’t sure what to do, so I read up on training methods to stop a jigging horse. Some say make the horse work really hard, so walking is a relief. That wouldn’t work with Luna; she was impossible to tire out.

 Others say to make the horse back up a step every time he starts to jig. Still others say rider tension causes jigging, so you should just relax.  
          With Luna, it took a combination of tools to teach her to walk quietly. First, I made sure to ride her on a loose rein. When she began to speed up, I’d lift one rein and ask for a bending stop. She soon learned that when one rein was lifted, it was time to slow down.
          Ever horse is different. If you have a jigger, experiment until you find a solution that works for him.

For more information about fixing a jigger, check out these helpful articles from The Trail Rider and EQUUS:

www.trailridermag.com/article/stop-jig-julie-goodnight-15693

www.trailridermag.com/article/calm-rider-calm-horse-14844

www.equusmagazine.com/article/trustworthy_trail_horse_052008-10655


a-home-for-every-horse-297x300 If you want more information on rescue horses or you want to locate a rescue near you, please check out AHomeForEveryHorse.com. Equine.com and the Active Interest Media Equine Network have joined forces with the American Horse Council’s Unwanted Horse Coalition to launch A Home for Every Horse Project. This project helps find homes for America’s 170,000 to 200,000 horses in need of care and shelter. Here’s how it works: • Begin the search for your next equine partner atAHomeForEveryHorse.com. You can search horses waiting for homes at nonprofit shelters across the country. Browse by rescue horse, or find rescue organizations in your area. • Visit the site’s “Services” section to learn about your local rescue organizations. Find out how you can volunteer, donate, or simply spread the word. • Look for upcoming stories on EquiSearch.com related to horse rescue. If your 501(c)(3) rescue organization would like to join the Home For Every Horse Project, call (866) 467-7323, ext. 100. Equine.com is a part of Active Interest Media Equine Network.


My First Rescue Horse

July 14, 2014

Roxanne Capaul
Credit: Roxanne Capaul
Dr. Deb Schlutz, DVM provides chiropractic care to horses in Boulder, CO. www.windwardvet.com
Banjo, my lovely rehabilitated rescue horse, is not my first rescue. My first was a gorgeous black Arabian mare with four white feet and a slim white blaze.

I met her when I first arrived at Colorado Horse Rescue as a volunteer. She’d only been there a few days, but she’d quickly earned a bad reputation. She would try to attack anyone who worked with her. She actually sent one volunteer to the hospital with a vicious bite to the face.

So why bother with a horse like that? Honestly, she was stunningly beautiful. I was drawn to her at first sight.

All this all happened many years ago, before I was a horse trainer. I was young and still learning. She was one of my most important teachers. I have two bite scars on my arm to prove it.

I spent many long hours with that lovely mare. We learned ground work together. I took her for long walks, just to be with her. We started to bond, but she was still dangerous.

I began to realize that her vicious outburst weren’t malicious, but a call for help. She was in pain.

So, what did I do? I adopted her!

I named her Tiri. I then began trying to determine what was wrong with her. The answer came in the form of equine chiropractic.

The chiropractor located many areas that needed adjustment. She also found signs of chronic pain. She suggested that Tiri had possibly been in some kind of accident. I included massage, acupuncture, and even cranial sacral work in Tiri’s care regimen.

Over the following months, Tiri completely changed. She became a sweet, sensitive, fun mount. She carried me all over the countryside. Later, when I started taking students, she was my lesson horse.The moral of the story: The only way animals have to tell us they’re in pain is often labeled “bad behavior.” Take the time and effort to determine what’s really going on.

For more information on equine pain/behavioral issues, check out this article from our friends at EQUUS: http://equusmagazine.com/article/aggressivebehavior_102607.

 

a-home-for-every-horse-297x300If you want more information on rescue horses or you want to locate a rescue near you, please check out AHomeForEveryHorse.com. Equine.com and the Active Interest Media Equine Network have joined forces with the American Horse Council’s Unwanted Horse Coalition to launch A Home for Every Horse Project. This project helps find homes for America’s 170,000 to 200,000 horses in need of care and shelter. 

 

Here’s how it works: 

• Begin the search for your next equine partner at AHomeForEveryHorse.com. You can search horses waiting for homes at nonprofit shelters across the country. Browse by rescue horse, or find rescue organizations in your area. 

• Visit the site’s “Services” section to learn about your local rescue organizations. Find out how you can volunteer, donate, or simply spread the word. 

• Look for upcoming stories on EquiSearch.com related to horse rescue. If your 501(c)(3) rescue organization would like to join the Home For Every Horse Project, call (866) 467-7323, ext. 100. 

 

Equine.com is a part of Active Interest Media Equine Network. 



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